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Lupin

The source of protein for the future.

Allow us to introduce: the sweet lupin. This high-protein crop has been at home in Europe for a long time now, but has hardly ever been used for purely plant-based foods – especially as a locally grown alternative to soya, rice, almonds and coconut.

Now, however, everyone is talking about the sweet lupin and it is more than just an alternative food. Because for LUVE we use the sweet lupin’s unique protein. And we do this by using a patented process that was developed at the Fraunhofer Institute in Freising, Germany.

01
Things are starting to blossom

At the beginning, the sweet lupin is still small and delicate – and it is hard to imagine what it is capable of.

02
And yet it is a rising star in its field.

The sweet lupin obviously feels perfectly at home in our climes and at the same time improves the quality of the soil.

03
It is such a great feeling when something bears fruit!

During its growth phase, the sweet lupin develops pods that house our nutritious lupin seeds.

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Let’s take a closer look at the lupin

The sweet lupin really does have it all and is a hidden star among plant-based alternative products. Compared to soya beans and other lupins, the sweet lupin contains the highest amount of nutritious protein and also impresses with its low carbohydrate and fat content.

Lupine

vs.

Sweet lupin

Protein
36-48%
Carbohydrates
5%
Fat
4-7%
Minerals
4-5%
*Sources

Ready, Steady, Lupin!

Our sweet lupin feels perfectly at home in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania and can be grown, harvested and processed here. The sweet lupin also has a lot to offer from an ecological point of view, because it enriches the soil with, among other things, nitrogen. A real bundle of energy – naturally!

From little seeds does protein grow.

Samen

1. Lupin seeds

First, the lupine seeds are shelled and pressed into flakes.

Flakes

2. Lupin flakes

In order to isolate the protein and wash out any unwanted flavours and fats, the flakes are then soaked and de-oiled.

Öl

3. Lupin oil

The nutritious lupin oil obtained during processing is used, for example, in bakery products and pasta.

Protein

4. Lupin protein

What remains is the pure, tasteless lupin protein: the basis of our delicious
MADE WITH LUVE products

Frequently asked questions

Where is the sweet lupin grown?

We attach great importance to a regional approach. That is why we are supplied exclusively by farmers from Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. Please note: The common garden lupin is not edible. We use the sweet lupin in our products, which has been specially cultivated for consumption.

Do your products contain allergens?

Our products contain lupin, which, just like wheat or soya, is an allergen that must be included in the labelling. Sadly, a small number of people are allergic to it. This mainly affects allergy sufferers who have a cross-allergy to other legumes. If you are unsure, it is advisable to take an allergy test with your doctor. All other traces of allergens that may be present in some products are marked on our packaging.

Other questions

* Lexikon der Lebensmittel und der Lebensmittelchemie, Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft Stuttgart, 4th edition 2005
Der kleine Souci Fachmann Kraut, Lebensmitteltabelle für die Praxis, Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft Stuttgart, 3rd edition 2004

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